NYFF08: Che Guevara and Debussy to a Disco Beat



As the 46th New York Film Festival slouches towards its final weekend — one more movie, one more party, and Catherine Deneuve in the flesh — it’s time for a little roundup. I’ve mainly posted capsules to Worldfilm, with the exception of Che, which is on track for my favorite of the year and required something lengthier.

Here’s an overview of what I’ve seen, with a few movies that still deserve reviews, including The Wrestler, Agnes Jaoui’s wonderful Let It Rain, and – not at the fest — Charlie Kaufman’s absolutely wretched Synecdoche, New York. In order of preference:

Che. Steven Soderbergh, 2008. ****
Let It Rain. Agnes Jaoui, 2008. ****
Tony Manero. Pablo Larrain, 2008. ****
Waltz with Bashir. Ari Folman, 2008. ****
Summer Hours. Olivier Assays. 2008. ***
The Wrestler. Darren Aronofsky, 2008. ***
Serbis. Brillante Mendoza, 2008. ***
24 City. Jia Zhangke, 2008. ***
The Headless Woman. Lucrecia Martel, 2008. ***
Chouga. Darezhan Omirbaev, 2007. ***
Gomorrah. Matteo Garrone, 2008. ***
Wendy and Lucy. Kelly Reichardt, 2008. **
Ashes of Time Redux. Wong Kar-Wei, 2008. **
Bullet in the Head. Jaime Rosales, 2008. **
Four Nights with Anna. Jerzy Skolimowski, 2008. *
Synecdoche, New York. Charlie Kaufman, 2008. *

Marcy also saw Changeling (*), The Class (***), and Happy-Go-Lucky (****). Photos soon.

I was faced with a choice at a difficult age…

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7hdS_qaGIQ

Easter Leftovers

Volk

I’ll have photos from holiday sojourn on Cape Cod later, but in the meantime I wanted to point to Commander König’s eerie and beautiful Easter-inspired photo series.

I just happened to mention Phish’s 1998 Prague shows the other day — turns out, the second night is being officially released on LivePhish today. You can listen to the Ghost for free. Some other time, I’ll tell you about how we stayed at an expat commune stalked by a mysterious “sickness” and the mirthless lectures on materialism I received from a future Park Slope real estate agent. I still have the poster we managed to rip off a downtown wall without being arrested by the Czech secret police.

Screening-wise, it’s been a slow week. I walked out of Olivier Assays’ Boarding Gate after it became clear that the tats on Asia Argento were the only interesting thing about it. Instead, I’ve been obsessing over my There Will Be Blood DVD — much more on this later.

Boarding Gate. Olivier Assayas, 2007. N/R